Monthly Archives: November 2010

A Different Spin on “Green” Advertising

Here is a short blog about a project we did up in Philly for Urban Outfitters along with Bluewing Environmental and DIRT landscape designs.

Read more on the Patriot LWM Blog:

When it comes to thinking outside the box, fashion design company Urban Outfitters has always been ahead of the curve.

So it should come as no surprise that their vision for the BioHaven Floating Treatment Wetland was not that of a typical client. Urban Outfitters integrated BioHaven® Floating Islands into the design overhaul of their headquarters in Philadelphia, PA first and foremost to  improve water quality in the neighboring Delaware River and stay true to their environmental roots. As floating island material can be “fashioned” in any shape, size and buoyancy, the wheels at Urban Outfitters started to turn…

Anyone who spends more than 10 minutes on the various walkways outside of the different Urban Outfitters design facilities can attest to the fact that the complex lies directly beneath the flight path for the Philadelphia Airport. To capitalize on the full potential of the BioHaven Floating Treatment Wetlands, Urban Outfitters requested that they be constructed in the shape of the company’s stock letters “URBN”. Fully visible from the air, the letters were installed in June of 2010 by Patriot LWM and Bluewing Environmental Solutions providing significant nutrient removal capabilities, innovative aesthetics, and creative advertising within the banks of the Delaware River.

For more on this project visit http://patriotlwm.com/biohaven-floating-island-projects/

TRUCK COMPANY 33 ON A KITCHEN FIRE: 298 POSSUM COURT

Was driving Truck 33 for this little thing.

Story from Kentland33.com:

At 0915 hours, box alarm 08-06 was transmitted for the townhouse on fire at 298 Possum Court. The assignment consisted of Engine Companies 8, 37, 38, 46, Truck Companies 26, 33 and Rescue Squad 6. First arriving Engine Company 8 reported a two-story, middle of the row, townhouse with smoke showing. Truck Company 33 responded on the run with a total of five volunteers. As the engine crews located a kitchen off on the first floor, Truck Company 33 arrived and split-up into two teams. The interior team initiated a search of the home and began opening-up. The outside crew placed portable ladders and ventilated. The fire was quickly contained and the assignment was scaled back quickly. Truck Company 33 was held and returned to service within one-hour. 

 
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Too Much of a Good Thing? Not When it Comes to Water Quality

Another little blog I put together for the Patriot LWM Blog:

A little over a year ago, our fellow BioHaven Floating Treatment Wetlands professionals from Floating Islands Environmental Solutions began an experiment in water quality inside the city of Naples, Florida. The Louisiana crew made their way down and installed a series of Floating Treatment Wetlands in various nutrient loaded water bodies selected by the City. The following news report gives a small snapshot into the potential of this innovative technology. Although this video mainly highlights the habitat creation abilities of the islands, it’s hard to deny that something very positive is taking place in this water body. Enjoy!

New Study Shows Potential to Use Floating Treatment Wetlands to Mitigate Lake Eutrophication and Increase Fishery Production

Here is a blog I wrote for the Patriot LWM Blog:

With everyday that passes, the true benefit of Floating Treatment Wetlands technology becomes more and more apparent to us here at Patriot LWM. Besides its obvious visual benefits created by the islands ability to instantly create flourishing habitat above and below the water, the true potential of the islands can not be seen with the naked eye. The matrix design of recycled plastic material allow for an increased surface area on which nutrient processing biofilm-based microbes attach. From this floating base of operation, the microbes work to breakdown nutrients that pass by them in the water. Intuitively we can only assume that the more water the Floating Treatment Wetland matrix and the associated microbes come in contact with, the higher its nutrient processing potential. The following study by Floating Island International takes a unique look at this statement and some interesting ways to get water in need of treatment to the microbes in need of nutrients.

The Problem:

Wetlands have long been known as natures purifiers, but as the worldwide acreage of wetlands continues to fall coupled with increased human-caused nutrient loading, many water bodies around the world have experienced cases of hyper-eutrophication. Simply stated Eutrophication is a scientific term describing the overfertilization of lakes with nutrients and the changes that occur as a result. Negative environmental effects include anoxia, or loss of oxygen in the water with severe reductions in fish and other animal populations. In fresh water, partly as a result of normal seasonal stratification, nutrient loading can deplete oxygen levels within the livable temperature zone for cold‐water fish species.

The Case Study:

In Shepherd, Montana at the home of Floating Island International, a 30 foot deep, 6.5 acre lake sits within sight of the famed Yellowstone River. The water near the surface was too warm to support a trout fishery, while the cool water underneath lacked the dissolved oxygen (DO) to do the same. During late summer no location inside the lake could consistently provide the cool-water, high-DO environment needed by fish such as rainbow, brown and Yellowstone cutthroat trout. From a fishery and property management standpoint, this basically serves as a 6.5 acre puddle of water. Enter the Leviathan…

The Solution:

In April 2009, a 1250‐square‐foot Leviathan system, incorporating floating stream beds and grid‐ powered water circulation was installed in the lake. This system circulates up to 2000 gpm through the stream channels within the island. The basic concept takes water from all levels of the lake which would previouslynot come in contact with the wetlands and circulates them through the stream channels of Floating Treatment matrix where microbes can process the nutrients.

The method allows you to basically super-charge the nutrient processing capability of your Floating Treatment Wetland and turn a once stagnant waterbody into a highly productive member of your land management program.

The Result:

After 17 months of operation, water clarity had improved from a low of 14 inches of visibility to as much as 131 inches. Simultaneously, the water temperature gradient was reduced, creating a larger zone of “livable” water for fish. Two age classes of Yellowstone cutthroat trout were introduced 13 and 14 months into the test. Through the summer of 2010, a favorable temperature/dissolved oxygen strata ranging from the water surface down to a depth of at least 12 feet was maintained as potential cutthroat habitat. One‐year‐old and two‐year‐old black crappies were also introduced two months into the test, and naturally‐occurring northern yellow perch were present in the lake when it was filled. All three species have flourished.

Fish catch rates and growth rates are now being monitored at the lake. Initial data show that experienced fishermen can catch up to one perch per minute. Visual observations from diving and an underwater viewing station indicate that perch approaching or exceeding the Montana state record of 2 pounds 2 ounces now inhabit the lake.

The research lake is relatively unique in that it supports fish accustomed to cold water (Yellowstone cutthroat trout), temperate water (perch) and warm water (crappies). Montana officials have made two unsuccessful attempts at sustaining cutthroat populations in an adjacent stretch of the Yellowstone River, which is located a half‐mile away from the research lake.

Further additions to the square footage of the original design for 2010 have further increased the “livable area” for fish to a depth of more than 20 feet at certain times of the year. This further maximizes the useable production space for the lakes fishery habitat.
Hope for the Future:

As data continues to be collected and more projects initiated, the future is very bright for the use of Floating Treatment Wetlands to restore the health of Americas water bodies. Patriot LWM is currently working with Bluewing Environmental to solidify 2 Leviathan test projects in Maryland. Stay tuned for more exciting news.

For more details on the above mentioned study CLICK HERE.

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Video & Training Tips from House Fire with One Trapped

Here is an older video and article thats on both Traditions Training and Fire Engineering blogs.

TT Instructor Joe Brown created this video of operations at a first floor fire last tour with a civilian rescued from the second floor.  While some of the video is dark, what should be emphasized in this situation is the communication between crews.

The rescue of a civilian is an exciting event.  Our primary mission is to save lives and when a victim is located it can tend to draw others away from their tasks.  You will notice in this video that when the victim is located, assistacne is given to the victim removal where needed but the other tasks continue, and when the victim is removed everyone get’s back to work. We must remember that a successful fireground results from a coordinated series of events — everyone has a job to do and must do it.  If someone drops their task, the entire fireground falls apart.

At present, all accounts are that the victim is hospitalized and will make a full recovery.  Job well done to the members of DCFD Engine 30 / Truck 17, Platoon #1!