Author Archives: Patriot Marketing

PRESENTATIONS FROM SUBURBAN DEER MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP POSTED

The following is a repost from my Patriot LWM Blog:

The University of Maryland Cooperative Extension Office has posted all the presentations and information from last months “Suburban Deer Management: Options and Choices for Decision-Makers” of which Patriot Land & Wildlife President Joe Brown was a guest speaker. The Forestry Resources Website has all the information you could need when it comes to making an educated decision regarding your suburban deer management issues.

CLICK HERE FOR PRESENTATIONS

SPOKE TOO SOON: DID YOU CATCH A FIRE ON YOUR COMMUTE?

So I had some time after this AM’s fire as I waited on morning relief to put up a blog post. No sooner had I posted the story then a text came accross my phone for a box alarm for my brothers at Kentland. 4:20 am, quiet nieghborhood, I knew it was going to be off. Moments later my relief came in and I was out, out the door and just over the DC, MD line where the 15 volunteers from Kentland went on the scene with fire showing. Although its not always my prefered method, it was nice to watch the brothers at work without being activly involved.

Here is their story from Kentland 33: 

ENGINE COMPANY, SQUAD COMPANY AND TRUCK COMPANY 33 WITH FIRE SHOWING IN CHAPEL OAKS: 1411 EARLY OAKS LANE

At 0418 hours, the box alarm was transmitted for the house on fire in the area of 1410 Early Oaks Drive in Chapel Oaks, Maryland. The assignment consisted of Engine Companies 38, 8, 5 and 33, Truck Companies 33, 55 and Rescue Engine 33 (as the Squad Company). Engine Company, Squad Company and Truck Company 33 responded on the alarm with a total of 15 volunteers. Engine Company 38 was the first to arrive and reported a one-story, detached home with fire showing. Engine Company 33 was the next unit to arrive. The crew laid a secondary water supply from a hydrant at 1422 Early Oaks Lane and stretched the 250-foot pre-connect to cover side “C” of the structure. Once in position the OIC gave a detailed size-up to Fire Communications and the crew advanced into the basement to check for fire/smoke conditions. After this area of the home was cleared, the crew advanced to the first floor where they began extinguishing several rooms on fire. Truck Company and Squad Company 33 arrived simultaneously to perform the first and second due special service duties. Both crews began searches, ventilation and laddering all sides of the building. Companies spent nearly one-hour bringing this stubborn fire under control. Within an hour and a half, Command continued to hold Companies 38, 33 and 55. Volunteers from the Kentland Volunteer Fire Department operated for approx. 3 and a half hours before retuning to service. One fireman from Company 33 sustained minor injuries and was transported to a local trauma center. The Officers and Membership of the Kentland Volunteer Fire Department, Inc. wish him a quick recovery. 

“SUMMER IN THE SECOND” – ANOTHER BUSY TOUR AT 17 TRUCK

Well this 24 hour tour had its share of excitement, from a special showing of Hangover 2 with the fellas, a police chase that ended too soon, Ambulance 30 getting passed by a PG police chase on the way to the hospital and rounding it all out with a first due fire. It’s apparent that the old adage about summer time in the Second Battalion may hold true for yet another year in a row. I am just going to keep holding on to that tiller wheel and see where it takes me. 

Here are just the 2 stories reposted from Engine 30s website. I have more helmet cam footage from this fire as well but I doubt time will allow that to make it to your screen anytime soon. So for now, enjoy the pics.

TRUCK 17 RUNS ONE OVERTURNED AND 2 TRAPPED AFTER POLICE CHASE ENDS IN SOUTHEAST

During the early afternoon hours Engine 19 was dispatched on the local alarm for an auto accident in the area of Randle Circle and Minnesota Ave. Southeast. Engine 19 arrived shortly after to find a police chase that ended with the dipper suspect t-boning another truck and putting it on its side. The suspect fled but they left behind a person trapped in each car. Engine 19 requested the rescue assignment bringing Truck 17, Rescue Squad 3 and others to the scene. Truck 17 arrived on scene an set up a safety perimeter and assisted with patient care as Squad 3 split their crews to free the victim in the car and stabilize the overturned truck. Once the door was removed from the car the crew took the roof off of the truck and removed that victim as well. Engine 19 stood by with a handline to support the extrication. Units picked up and returned to service a short time later.   
 
At 12:44 hrs units with the Second Battalion were alerted for a reported house on fire in the 4500 block of Grant St. NE. Engine 27 arrived to find a one story single family home with heavy fire showing and extension to the B-bravo exposure. As Engine 27 stretched their line to the fire building Truck 17’s crew laddered and quickly searched the exposure building, finding no immediate extension into the structure. Engine 30 reported to the rear and found a similar situation, stretching their line and getting water on the fire. Very early into the incident the fire building was deemed a defensive operation and larger lines were put into service by the crews of Engine 27, 30 and Truck 17 to knock down the bulk of the fire. Truck 17 put the ladder pipe in the air but the extra water was not needed as the fire was knocked down. Crews opened up the outer walls on the exposure building and finding only minor extension the incident was scaled back.  

“Aggressive Searches” Fire Engineering Talk Radio Episode 38 featuring Traditions Training

Episode 38 Fire Engineering Talk Radio

In case you missed it here is the latest episode of Fire Engineering Talk Radio featuring myself and the rest of the Traditions Training crew as we tackle the topic of “Aggressive Searches). Its always a fun time getting to chat with the brothers. Just ignore the porn star voice at the beginning and the rest should be semi-entertaining.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/btrplayer.swf

Listen to internet radio with fireengineeringtalkradio on Blog Talk Radio

ROOM OFF WITH PEOPLE TRAPPED FOR THE HEIGHTS: 5105 F STREET SOUTHEAST

The following is a repost from http://www.30Engine.com for the fire we had last tour. A bunch of interesting talking points came out of this fire so I will try to post some stuff up in the next week or so. My helmet cam footage as the Tillerman is pretty dark so I doubt I will have anything video related.

Fire Showing from Side C-Charlie

The East End Crew with Chief Del Balzo on what might be his last fire with DC

Story from 30 Engine:

Just after 2100 hrs units with the second and third battalion were alerted for the report of a building fire at 5105 F St. SE. Engine 30 arrived on the scene and reported a 3 story garden style apartment building with smoke showing from the roof area. Truck 17 arrived just behind them and were greeted by several residents stating that there were people trapped on the upper floors. As the Engine crew advanced the 200ft 1 1/2″ preconnected handline into the building Truck 17s crew worked to ladder the building and vent the structure. Interior crews located a room off in an apartment on the second floor (although labeled 102) and made quick work of it. Rescue Squad 3 removed one patient with smoke inhalation from a top floor apartment (labeled 204). Although a second alarm was requested it was quickly returned as the incident was deemed under control. Truck 17 with the help of Engine 30 and Engine 8 (RIT) threw 175′ of ground ladders to the building with Truck 16 and Engine 27 laddering the rear with additional ladders. Great job by all crews involved especially Battalion Fire Chief #2 Del Balzo who celebrated his retirement just that very afternoon with the fellas of East End.

  

Those We Remember: Memorial Day 2011

Enough Said

Memorial Day and it’s associated “weekend” means different things to different people. For me it has always been a combination of remembering those that made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom as well as about remembering those that made an impact in our lives and have since passed on. My life has been blessed to have been dotted with many influential people who helped shape my ideals and my outlook on life. From a young age it was instilled in me the importance of the sacrifice of those from the past, I’m sure I used to freak my parents out when at 10 year old I would rather go to Gettysburg or out back with a medal detector then to a movie. As a new father I try to do my best to give my son those same experiences that he will hopefully draw strength from later in life. Our first stop this weekend was to the secret resting spot of the hero for which my son gets his middle name, to visit “Uncle Kirk”. To see Kirks memorial video CLICK HERE.

Rocking the Air Force Jersey at Rolling Thunder 2011

Our next stop was down to the always amazing “Rolling Thunder” to honor Americas MIA and KIA. My 3 year old was so impressed with the display that he waved steady for over an hour, not an easy feat for a son with an attention span like mine. Here is a great video showing what determination and discipline looks like.

Memorial day brought a celebration at the Land of Kent where I got the special treat of a phone call from Afghanistan. One of Kentlands lost sons, Scott Motley, was checking in from an ocean away. A few good lucks and keep your head lows and he was off to serve again along side the rest of his brothers. Off to protect our right to cook hot dogs and visit the beach on this Memorial Day “weekend”. We are thankful for Scott and the rest of his Devil Dogs.

Scott Motley - USMC

Serving over seas flag flying proudly at the Land for Scott

From there is was back to the BBQ and talks of those who are no longer with us. One of which being Mark “Mick” McKenzie, the man who took me under his wing, taught me the ropes of the special service life style, and helped me see the error in my flare covered helmet ways. Here is a little video I made awhile ago in his memory. CLICK HERE.

Almost as if Mick was listening, Rescue Engine 33, with me in the seat, got put on a Capitol Heights house fire with fire showing from the rear of the home. STORY HERE. After an hour or so of work we got to slide on back to the Kentland BBQ to finish honoring the fallen.

A different kind of Memorial Day BBQ

Its funny how when your younger you don’t quite understand the importance of certain people or their roll until their gone. There are more than a handful of people I wish I would have had more time to sit and talk with, sit and learn with. To learn about all they had done in their lives and knowledge they had to offer. One such individual was my Great-grandfather Forest “Mike” Mills, who just recently passed away in 2006. I remember his stories of serving in the engine room of the USS Enterprise during World War II, about the sounds the ship would make when an enemy bomber crashed just feet from the great carrier. I listened as a child listens, for the story and not the meaning. Little did I know until several years later that this “ship” was not just any ship, but instead the Big “E” was the most decorated ship of the entire war, fighting in some of the most famous battles in history. Battles that shaped the future of our great Nation and ensured a bright future for those left behind. I wish I had paid a little closer attention to those story’s now that he is gone.

So for those we remember, and those we wish we had more memories of, happy Memorial Day.

My Great Grandfathers first and last trip to the WWII Memorial in DC

Forest "Mike" Mills, US Navy

A View from the Tillercage: A Brief Exercise in Rhetoric

An exercise in rhetoric inspired by the writings of Matt “Maine” Hall. His recent facebook descriptions of late night ramblings from the ghetto of our home in Landover has inspired me to try my hand. Here is a late night rambling from a memorial weekend spent in the back of Truck 17.

For Maine:

Our chariot comes to a stop just shy of the entrance to the apartment complex, the heroes of “The Heights” answer the never ending call for service, this time its the ever elusive activated CO detector. I watch as my crew makes their way up the hill towards the mountain of brick and mortar known as Benning Park Apartments. Heavy eyelids give way to an unrelenting stare as i catch myself gazing longingly through the dust covered window of my tillermans perch. The iridescent hue of a lone streetlight joins with the familiar reds and blues of a passing police cruiser, together they bring identity to the darken street sign. 4900 G st. SE. My temporary inhabitancy now has a name.

The air is cool and crisp as it recoils from the recently passed storm. The night is alive with activity, people pass but seldom wave, families and felons share the sidewalk together as they stroll into the emptiness of the East End night. My thoughts drift away from this place much the same as the dreams of the areas youth, away to a place far removed from the brutal realities of “The Heights”. Thoughts of a future with manageable hours, of nights with adequate sleep, of holidays at home with family and friends. The recurring thud of a car stereo gains strength as it closes on my position, the roar of exhaust from a passing donked-out caprice jerks me back to my observatory high atop 17 truck.

My attention shifts to a conveniently placed pair of “Air Jordans” dangling from the electric line above my head, swaying gingerly in the evening breeze, beckoning to this spot those in search of a quick high to lift them from this place. My band of brothers makes their way back down the hill from the building entrance, laughing and jostling, bonded together by the experiences and the tragedies they’ve shared, forged into friends at trail by fire. They know how quickly the song can change, how that next call for service might find them staring the red devil and his fiery minions square in the face, daring my brothers to enter in protection of these same families and felons that call East End their home. This fire forcing them to rise up to their best when DC citizens are at their worst. These men, these firemen, know that only the bond of brotherhood will bring them through the flames and back alive.

I chuckle to myself as a new thought creeps into mind. These moments i will miss, this ghetto i will miss, these brothers I will miss…

Chucky Ryan gets Released from the Burn Center

Well after 2 months of long nights surrounded by friends and a hard fought healing process, Firefighter Chucky Ryan has finally returned home from the burn center. Chucky was burned along with 4 other firefighters searching for victims during a house fire in Truck 17’s first due. His first stop? Rescue 3 to see the brothers of course. Here’s to a great guy who’s love for the job infects all  those around him. Welcome Home Chucky, see you inside a burning southeast rowhome soon.

Check out this great video from Channel 9:

Hope Floats – Man-made islands create ecosystems to heal polluted rivers

Here is a repost from our blog over at Patriot LWM:

A few years ago, Patriot Land and Wildlife was fortunate to be involved with an innovative water quailty improvement project in Washington, DC on the Anacostia River. Teamed with Bluewing Environmental Solutions and Technologies, Patriot LWM helped install several BioHaven Floating Treatment Wetlands at Diamond Teague Park in DC, with the intention of providing much-needed water quality improvement. These BioHaven islands are capable of removing as many nutrients from the waterbody as 6 acres of natural wetlands.

Diamond Teague is just across the street from the Washington Nationals baseball stadium and is a popular riverside destination for ballpark patrons, among others. The dual functionaility of water quality stewardship and ornamental landscaping allowed for a great project to occur, and lots of attention drawn to the problems suffered by our waterways.  Author Mike Cronin of “The Daily” spotlights the project.

Image

It turns out that recycled plastic may do more for the environment than just save it from unnecessary garbage. Man-made floating islands constructed from the stuff are helping to revive urban rivers devastated by centuries of industrial pollution.The Anacostia River in Washington, D.C., for example, has been slowly coming back to life, roughly two years after the Maryland-based company Blue Wing Environmental Solutions and Technology anchored seven man-made islands there in an area near Nationals Park, where the Washington Nationals play. Those islands are the brainchild of Bruce and Anne Kania, the married couple who run Floating Islands International in Shepherd, Mont.“We are providing an affordable, doable, non-chemical solution, and people are going, ‘Aha!’ ” said Anne, Floating Islands’ CEO.Bruce realized years ago that wetlands work naturally to clean up pollutants, so the Kanias started mimicking floating ecosystems with recycled fiber from plastic bottles.
Just days after the floating islands are placed in the water, a film of bacteria and other microbes forms on the mesh filters and other plastic parts of the fake landmasses, said Bruce, adding that the microbes eat nutrients and form biofilm in the process. Biofilm is the base of periphyton, which is in turn the base of the freshwater food chain. Everything from zooplankton to nymphs and minnows thrive off it.“They clean up the water and take nutrients that otherwise would have turned into algae and turn them into fish food,” said Bruce, who got the idea for the floating islands after observing the natural, peat-based floating islands of northern Wisconsin.“Three years ago, we could see only 14 inches into our 6.5-acre research pond,” he said. “Now, we can see 11 feet into it.”

The Kanias founded their company in 2005. Today they have seven manufacturers worldwide and 4,000 islands in use around the globe. Customers pay roughly $27 per square foot and may order any shape or size of floating island, which can be used in rivers, ponds, lakes and even the ocean.
Kevin Hedge, a wetland scientist and partner at Blue Wing, sees the synthetic islands as more than just a savior to an ailing environment.

“The floating islands are an ecological-restoration tool that also can be an economic-recovery tool,” he said.

Lanshing Hwang, the Maryland landscape architect who designed the island park in Washington, called it “an innovative approach — particularly for places that don’t have wetlands.

By Mike Cronin Saturday – May 21, 2011

“The Anvil of God”, A Great Documentary on Falluja Featuring Cpl. Kirk Bosselmann

Now that I have this blog to put out some cool info to those that care, I wanted to put up a great documentary from Anderson Cooper 360 about the battle for Falluja that also features my best friend and hero, Cpl. Kirk Bosselmann and his good friend from Baltimore, Cpl. Nicholas Ziolkowski. Kirks mother gave me a copy of the report and I turned around and put it on Youtube. Hope you enjoy.