Blog Archives

Fire Engineering Blog Talk Radio about MAYDAY Incident

In case you missed it here is the Fire Engineering Blog Talk Radio Traditions Training Tuesday where we talked about the fire at #87 Herrington Drive in PG County Maryland that put my friend Danny McGown in the burn center. Listen in as those who were there go over just what went down, step by step, and hopefully it will help you prepare incase you are placed in that position, God forbid.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/btrplayer.swf?file=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Eblogtalkradio%2Ecom%2Ffireengineeringtalkradio%2Fplay%5Flist%2Exml%3Fshow%5Fid%3D2253071&autostart=true&bufferlength=5&volume=80&borderweight=1&bordercolor=#999999&backgroundcolor=#FFFFFF&dashboardcolor=#0098CB&textcolor=#F0F0F0&detailscolor=#FFFFFF&playlistcolor=#999999&playlisthovercolor=#333333&cornerradius=10&callback=http://www.blogtalkradio.com/FlashPlayerCallback.aspx&C1=7&C2=6042973&C3=31&C4=&C5=&C6=&hostname=fireengineeringtalkradio&hosturl=http://www.blogtalkradio.com/fireengineeringtalkradio

Listen to internet radio with fireengineeringtalkradio on Blog Talk Radio

Also, here is the Radio Transmissions from that fire:

“Aggressive Searches” Fire Engineering Talk Radio Episode 38 featuring Traditions Training

Episode 38 Fire Engineering Talk Radio

In case you missed it here is the latest episode of Fire Engineering Talk Radio featuring myself and the rest of the Traditions Training crew as we tackle the topic of “Aggressive Searches). Its always a fun time getting to chat with the brothers. Just ignore the porn star voice at the beginning and the rest should be semi-entertaining.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/btrplayer.swf

Listen to internet radio with fireengineeringtalkradio on Blog Talk Radio

Helmet Cam Training Video: Removing Window Mounted AC Units During Ventilation

Another old video blog available both on the Traditions Training and Fire Engineering Blog sites.

Here is the latest in our “Voiceover Training Tips Video Series” straight from the fireground to your computer screen. In this video Traditions Training Instructor Joe Brown takes us through some of his thoughts and actions when approaching a window mounted air conditioning unit during ventilation. The fire is on the second floor of a 2-story brick end-of-the-row home, Joe is part of the Outside Vent Team on DCFD Truck 17 and his actions are in conjunction with the Interior Search Team and Suppression Teams. As you watch the video think about what your actions may have been and how they might vary with different building constructions in your District. Leave us some feedback and open some discussion at your firehouse kitchen table or computer screen. As always, stay safe out there.

New FD Article: PLAY LIKE YOU PRACTICE: Part 1 “Introduction to the concept”

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A concept which seems to be increasingly lost on today's fire service

 
I put up a new article for all you fire service jokers out there. Its called “Play like you Practice” (and yes I understand its backwards) so check it out to find out what I’m talking about.
 
And because I’m too stupid to figure out how to not display the entire blog entry on the home page, you can find the full article at the following links:
 
Article:
 

Fire on Southern Ave. New Helmet Cam Training Video

Here is another helmet cam training video. This one is from a first due fire on Southern Ave. The blog can also be found on the Traditions Training Blog.

Last week, prior to leaving for FDIC, an interactive discussion began on the Traditions Training facebook page based on a single picture, one moment in time. The picture was placed with a scenario and the readers were asked to give their thoughts and approaches to the scene. The picture was actually a freeze frame from Traditions Training instructor Joe Browns helmet cam footage from a fire that occurred earlier that same day. The below video is that helmet cam footage coupled with voice over training tips to help viewers identify with what is taking place. We have received a lot of positive feed back from Joe’s last video (found here) and how it has helped viewers’ better train and prepare for that next fire. We are pleased to be able to bring you another installment in the never ending process of becoming better firefighters.    

This video is filmed from point of view of DCFD 17 Truck’s outside vent man (OVM) position on a 2 story middle of the row home with fire on the second floor. For more detailed information on the fire visit http://www.30engine.com/fullstory.php?106159. Please feel free to share your thoughts, tips and comments with us in the comments section. Stay safe and enjoy.      

KENTLAND VOLUNTEERS FEATURED IN APRILS FIRE ENGINEERING

The April issue of Fire Engineering sporting a nostalgic cover in celebration of the history of the “National Fireman’s Journal” also referenced 2 members from the Kentland Volunteer Fire Department. In the article “The Two-Team Truck Company”  Kentland Volunteer Nick Martin looks at maximizing efficiency and accomplishing essential truck company tasks during the attack phase of a structural fire in true Kentland fashion.

This issue also contains Tower Ladder Captain Joe Browns nomination for the prestigious 2010 Ray Downey Courage & Valor Award. Captain Brown was nominated for his actions during the rescue of an unconscious fellow firefighter during a 2009 house fire. http://www.kentland33.com/news/fullstory/newsid/83967

 
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Training tips through the eyes of the outside vent man: Helmet cam footage with voiceover training tips

The voiceover helmet cam video that started it all. You can also find this joker on the Traditions Training or Fire Engineering Blogs.

The above video features helmet cam footage from Traditions Training Instructor Joe Brown as he operates as DCFD’s Truck 17 outside vent man. Watch through his point of view as firefighters battle a fire on the 1st and 2nd floors of a 2 story single family home. The video features some voice over training tips to help viewers identify with what is going on. The video is meant to initiate a discussion within your firehouse on your departments procedures and individual responsibilities on the fireground. Hopefully it will create a starting point for interactive training in your response area. We hope this video may help you on your journey to becoming a better firefighter. Please feel free to share your thoughts, tips and comments with us in the comment section. Enjoy.

 For a more detailed description of the fire visit http://www.30engine.com/fullstory.php?98903