Blog Archives

Helmet Cam Training Video: Removing Window Mounted AC Units During Ventilation

Another old video blog available both on the Traditions Training and Fire Engineering Blog sites.

Here is the latest in our “Voiceover Training Tips Video Series” straight from the fireground to your computer screen. In this video Traditions Training Instructor Joe Brown takes us through some of his thoughts and actions when approaching a window mounted air conditioning unit during ventilation. The fire is on the second floor of a 2-story brick end-of-the-row home, Joe is part of the Outside Vent Team on DCFD Truck 17 and his actions are in conjunction with the Interior Search Team and Suppression Teams. As you watch the video think about what your actions may have been and how they might vary with different building constructions in your District. Leave us some feedback and open some discussion at your firehouse kitchen table or computer screen. As always, stay safe out there.

Video & Training Tips from House Fire with One Trapped

Here is an older video and article thats on both Traditions Training and Fire Engineering blogs.

TT Instructor Joe Brown created this video of operations at a first floor fire last tour with a civilian rescued from the second floor.  While some of the video is dark, what should be emphasized in this situation is the communication between crews.

The rescue of a civilian is an exciting event.  Our primary mission is to save lives and when a victim is located it can tend to draw others away from their tasks.  You will notice in this video that when the victim is located, assistacne is given to the victim removal where needed but the other tasks continue, and when the victim is removed everyone get’s back to work. We must remember that a successful fireground results from a coordinated series of events — everyone has a job to do and must do it.  If someone drops their task, the entire fireground falls apart.

At present, all accounts are that the victim is hospitalized and will make a full recovery.  Job well done to the members of DCFD Engine 30 / Truck 17, Platoon #1!

Fire on Southern Ave. New Helmet Cam Training Video

Here is another helmet cam training video. This one is from a first due fire on Southern Ave. The blog can also be found on the Traditions Training Blog.

Last week, prior to leaving for FDIC, an interactive discussion began on the Traditions Training facebook page based on a single picture, one moment in time. The picture was placed with a scenario and the readers were asked to give their thoughts and approaches to the scene. The picture was actually a freeze frame from Traditions Training instructor Joe Browns helmet cam footage from a fire that occurred earlier that same day. The below video is that helmet cam footage coupled with voice over training tips to help viewers identify with what is taking place. We have received a lot of positive feed back from Joe’s last video (found here) and how it has helped viewers’ better train and prepare for that next fire. We are pleased to be able to bring you another installment in the never ending process of becoming better firefighters.    

This video is filmed from point of view of DCFD 17 Truck’s outside vent man (OVM) position on a 2 story middle of the row home with fire on the second floor. For more detailed information on the fire visit http://www.30engine.com/fullstory.php?106159. Please feel free to share your thoughts, tips and comments with us in the comments section. Stay safe and enjoy.      

Training tips through the eyes of the outside vent man: Helmet cam footage with voiceover training tips

The voiceover helmet cam video that started it all. You can also find this joker on the Traditions Training or Fire Engineering Blogs.

The above video features helmet cam footage from Traditions Training Instructor Joe Brown as he operates as DCFD’s Truck 17 outside vent man. Watch through his point of view as firefighters battle a fire on the 1st and 2nd floors of a 2 story single family home. The video features some voice over training tips to help viewers identify with what is going on. The video is meant to initiate a discussion within your firehouse on your departments procedures and individual responsibilities on the fireground. Hopefully it will create a starting point for interactive training in your response area. We hope this video may help you on your journey to becoming a better firefighter. Please feel free to share your thoughts, tips and comments with us in the comment section. Enjoy.

 For a more detailed description of the fire visit http://www.30engine.com/fullstory.php?98903