Blog Archives

“The Anvil of God”, A Great Documentary on Falluja Featuring Cpl. Kirk Bosselmann

Now that I have this blog to put out some cool info to those that care, I wanted to put up a great documentary from Anderson Cooper 360 about the battle for Falluja that also features my best friend and hero, Cpl. Kirk Bosselmann and his good friend from Baltimore, Cpl. Nicholas Ziolkowski. Kirks mother gave me a copy of the report and I turned around and put it on Youtube. Hope you enjoy.





6 Months in 3 Minutes “The Forgotten Trail Cam”

Video I made from the Patriot LWM Outdoors Blog:

So sitting around the office on a rainy day catching up on work, it occurred to us that we were a few trail cams short after the season. After scratching our heads for some time we remembered where we put one. This is what we found when we checked the card…6 months and still going strong. If nothing else its a cool way to kill 3 minutes, ENJOY!

GWU STUDENTS RAISE OVER $37,000 FOR THE BURN FOUNDATION AND I GOT TO DANCE

So in what has become an extremely successful tradition over the years, the GWU Chi Omega Firefighter Challege has raised tens of thousands of dollars in the name of the DC Firefighters Burn Foundation. The weekend long event features prepaired skits, a field day and much more. Normally the videos are filmed at some preppy station up in Northwest DC, but this year the brave young lads made a trip East of the River to visit the fellas of 30 Engine and 17 Truck. Here is the result…..

Migration is for the “birds”…Resident Geese present new challenges for managers

Article I put together featuring some custom cell phone camera footage from my brief time at Montgomery College.

From the Patriot LWM Blog:

 
The Canada Goose has long been a recognizable member of the waterfowl flotilla bobbing up and down on Maryland’s many lakes, rivers and ponds. From early childhood we are taught about the winter migration of waterfowl “flying South for the winter” and back North to lay and hatch their young.
As the years past and the occasional nesting pair became nesting flocks, one couldn’t help but wonder if the popular saying failed to make its way to the geese. Year round populations of geese have become a common occurrence in Maryland, going from neat to nuisance for many citizens.
 
The Resident Goose:
 
This new emergence of non-migrating geese have created a new term in the wildlife management community, the now infamous “Resident Goose”. These resident geese do just that, reside year round on area water bodies, lawns, golf courses and crop fields. If unharrased, they often roost in the same place night after night and utilize food sources in the immediate area day after day. With a mature goose defecating nearly a pound a day, the damage begins to mount in those areas. Problems including high nitrogen levels in water bodies, damage to crops, landscapes and ball fields from overgrazing, as well as the health hazards attributed to human interaction with their waste.
These geese begin nesting in late February and March with eggs hatching sometime in late April. Average clutch sizes range from 3-6 eggs with females reproducing after 2-3 years of age and sometimes getting very aggressive in defense of their nests during this time period. Sometime in late June to mid July these geese go through a 4-6 week molting period in which they lose their flight feathers and are stuck to the ground with the rest of us. This process goes on year after year with potential ages of resident geese reaching sometimes over 20 years.
These older resident geese have become very wise to the tricks of the hunting community, taking up residence often in uphuntable areas within the urban fringe. Golf course ponds, homeowners association stormwater management areas, local government water features and even tops of buildings often become preferred habitat; see attached video below.

Too Much of a Good Thing? Not When it Comes to Water Quality

Another little blog I put together for the Patriot LWM Blog:

A little over a year ago, our fellow BioHaven Floating Treatment Wetlands professionals from Floating Islands Environmental Solutions began an experiment in water quality inside the city of Naples, Florida. The Louisiana crew made their way down and installed a series of Floating Treatment Wetlands in various nutrient loaded water bodies selected by the City. The following news report gives a small snapshot into the potential of this innovative technology. Although this video mainly highlights the habitat creation abilities of the islands, it’s hard to deny that something very positive is taking place in this water body. Enjoy!

Video & Training Tips from House Fire with One Trapped

Here is an older video and article thats on both Traditions Training and Fire Engineering blogs.

TT Instructor Joe Brown created this video of operations at a first floor fire last tour with a civilian rescued from the second floor.  While some of the video is dark, what should be emphasized in this situation is the communication between crews.

The rescue of a civilian is an exciting event.  Our primary mission is to save lives and when a victim is located it can tend to draw others away from their tasks.  You will notice in this video that when the victim is located, assistacne is given to the victim removal where needed but the other tasks continue, and when the victim is removed everyone get’s back to work. We must remember that a successful fireground results from a coordinated series of events — everyone has a job to do and must do it.  If someone drops their task, the entire fireground falls apart.

At present, all accounts are that the victim is hospitalized and will make a full recovery.  Job well done to the members of DCFD Engine 30 / Truck 17, Platoon #1!

VIDEO ON HOW TO PUT OUT A FIRE: A HOUSE IN BOULEVARD HEIGHTS: 4604 DAVIS AVENUE:

Here is a video and fire that I had to edit (see if you can find what I added) in response to the overwhelming amount of cowards gracing todays internet impersonating firemen. I was driving the truck on this one so I didn’t get much, but the fellas that did sure did it well. FIRES ARE SUPPOSED TO GO OUT!! THATS OUR JOB!

Story as seen on Kentland33.com:

Around midnight, the box alarm was transmitted for the house on fire in the 4600 block of Davis Avenue in Boulevard Heights, Maryland. This assignment brought Truck Company and Chief 33 with seven volunteers. Duty Chief 800 was the first fire department unit to arrive and reported fire showing “from pretty much everywhere”. Rescue Squad 27, Truck Company 37 and Engine Companies 26 and 8 arrived next and went to work. Chief 33 arrived seconds later and was assigned to work with the crews on division one. Two hand lines were positioned on side “A” and an aggressive, coordinated attack was carried out to quickly extinguish the fire. Truck Company 33 arrived as this was being carried out and assumed the Rapid Intervention duties. The crew placed portable ladders, assured egress points and developed a rescue plan for the home. Volunteers from Kentland operated for approx. 35 minutes before the incident was scaled back.

 
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Fire on Southern Ave. New Helmet Cam Training Video

Here is another helmet cam training video. This one is from a first due fire on Southern Ave. The blog can also be found on the Traditions Training Blog.

Last week, prior to leaving for FDIC, an interactive discussion began on the Traditions Training facebook page based on a single picture, one moment in time. The picture was placed with a scenario and the readers were asked to give their thoughts and approaches to the scene. The picture was actually a freeze frame from Traditions Training instructor Joe Browns helmet cam footage from a fire that occurred earlier that same day. The below video is that helmet cam footage coupled with voice over training tips to help viewers identify with what is taking place. We have received a lot of positive feed back from Joe’s last video (found here) and how it has helped viewers’ better train and prepare for that next fire. We are pleased to be able to bring you another installment in the never ending process of becoming better firefighters.    

This video is filmed from point of view of DCFD 17 Truck’s outside vent man (OVM) position on a 2 story middle of the row home with fire on the second floor. For more detailed information on the fire visit http://www.30engine.com/fullstory.php?106159. Please feel free to share your thoughts, tips and comments with us in the comments section. Stay safe and enjoy.      

Training tips through the eyes of the outside vent man: Helmet cam footage with voiceover training tips

The voiceover helmet cam video that started it all. You can also find this joker on the Traditions Training or Fire Engineering Blogs.

The above video features helmet cam footage from Traditions Training Instructor Joe Brown as he operates as DCFD’s Truck 17 outside vent man. Watch through his point of view as firefighters battle a fire on the 1st and 2nd floors of a 2 story single family home. The video features some voice over training tips to help viewers identify with what is going on. The video is meant to initiate a discussion within your firehouse on your departments procedures and individual responsibilities on the fireground. Hopefully it will create a starting point for interactive training in your response area. We hope this video may help you on your journey to becoming a better firefighter. Please feel free to share your thoughts, tips and comments with us in the comment section. Enjoy.

 For a more detailed description of the fire visit http://www.30engine.com/fullstory.php?98903